Skip to main content

About your Search

20110325
20110325
STATION
MSNBC 8
WRC (NBC) 2
CNN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WETA 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
>> couric: tonight, two weeks into japan's disaster and it just keeps getting worse. the death toll passes 10,000 and now there may be a breach in one of the nuclear reactors. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the united states may be giving up command of the libya mission, but american forces will still be playing a major role in the operation. the fire that woke up the country to dangers in the workplace. and a population explosion. the colorful comeback of the monarch butterfly. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. japan's prime minister says the nuclear crisis is far from over and the goal right now, he says, is simply to keep it from getting worse. but it did today with a possible breach of one of the reactors. it was two weeks ago that they were damaged when a magnitude nine earthquake shook northern japan and triggered a tsunami. the official death toll passed the 10,000 mark today. 17,000 people are still missing. and now the japanese government has expande
concerns tonight about radiation in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation ty
, will be david gregory's guests. we take you to japan. nuclear crisis getting worse. officials saying they believe there's a breach in the reactor core of unit number three at the damaged fukushima plant. what that means is that more radiation than first thought could be leaking right now. the suspected breach found when two workers were burned whi eed wading into water, 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. there may be a crack in the core or the spent fuel rod pool. all work has since stopped at the plant and japan's prime minister is saying the situation is very grave and the government is not in a position to be optimistic. joining me live from seoul, soesoe soek. >> reporter: good afternoon, as you say, the government did announce today that they -- what they think is happening is there there is a leak. they were cautious not to use the word breach because they're not clear where the source is coming from that affected the workers that you mentioned who were hospitalized yesterday. two of those workers, there were three altogether hospitalized, two of the workers were sent o
. i'm thomas roberts. we start in japan where there have been reports of a suspected breach in the core of reactor three. workers were pulled out of the complex as a safety precaution while the possibility of more radiation leaks over that region. japan's prime minister called this situation, quote, very grave and serious during a press conference that was hours after this setback. he reassured the citizens that nuclear techs and the government are taking a cautious approach in each step of this process. >>> the death toll from the dual disasters that rocked the nation continue to rise. more than 10,000 are dead and still 17,000 missing residents. nbc's lee cowan is live in tokyo this morning. lee, what are we hearing right now about the fukushima plant and any kind of extension as a precaution to the japanese exclusion zone for the potential of radiation? >> reporter: well, thomas, there is an extension, although it's still voluntary at this point. the people that were told 19 miles out, 20 miles out that they were told to basically stay indoors over the last couple weeks,
, in a reactor core, as japan faces a true nuclear catastrophe. workers burned by 10,000 times normal radiation. will parts of japan now be lost for generations? >>> in this country, superbug. growing concern this morning over a brand-new drug-resistant bacteria taking hold in california hospitals. is it on the move? dr. besser is standing by right here this morning. >>> crowning glory. this beauty queen wins her crown back in a highly publicized trial, after losing it because she was accused of being too fat. told to lay off the tacos. she's here live after her victory. >>> and put your paws up, going gaga this morning for polar cubs. two, new polar bears take the world stage. they're already capturing the world's heart. >>> good morning, again, everyone. thanks for spending the week with us. it's been good having david muir here with us. we're going to get to japan in a moment. >> so much breaking news this morning. >>> we're also tracking a story we broke at abc news. an air traffic controller working alone and asleep on the job at a major airport as two planes were landing. this morning, we
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
following general recommendations from the japan nuclear safety commission. >> we'll continue to follow it. >>> joining me to assess the situation in japan, nuclear fph frank von hippel. officials revealing a suspected breach in the reactor at the fukushima plant. this could mean a much more serious radioactive contamination that may be we haven't known so far exactly what's go on behind those walls there. but is it time to give up this battle, about cooling reactors and follow the lead in what they did in chernobyl, and that is to shut the plant down completely? >> no, they don't have the option of shutting it down. chernobyl was a very different situation. the core basically blew itself. a lot of the core blew into the atmosphere, and the rest melted down into the ground. and then they -- after a while they built this so-called sarcophagus to close it off. there's too much energy coming out of the fuel to walk away. they still have to keep trying to cool it. the problem is that we're now two weeks after the accident started and they haven't -- they don't have a handle on the situation ye
>>> a suspected breach at the reactor core of one of the crippled nuclear plants. japan's prime minister calls the situation grave and serious. a sea of protesters in yemen with demonstrators demanding their leader leave now. what does all this mean for the u.s. war on terror? >>> asleep in the tower. troubling questions about who is keeping watch at the nation's other airports as officials now confirm an air traffic controller was napping on the job. >>> it's friday. so do you have your office beer ready? apparently booze in the workplace is making a comeback. could it actually make us more productive? >>> we begin with the devastate nug develop in japan, radioactive contamination from the troubled fukushima nuclear power plant more severe than first thought. japan's prime minister spoke just a short time ago, calling the situation there very grave and serious. nuclear safety officials now suspect a dangerous breach in the core of a reactor. the evacuation zone has expanded from a 12-mile radius. people who are up to 19 miles mr. the plant are being told to leave. >>> also this
are overwhelmed. >>> in sendai, japan, there are signs of recovery. u.s. marines are busy there helping to clear away cars and other debris left in the tsunami's wake. >> we've been clearing it for the past few days, so we're making good progress. >>> let's head to tokyo and nbc's lee cowan who's developing stories there. >> reporter: it all stems from the injuries to the workers we talked about yesterday, the ones that were in the basement level of unit number three. they were trying to strip a cable there. they came in contact with radioactive water and had to be taken to the water. they were actually transferred to a hospital here in tokyo today so they could monitor their condition a little more closely. the consider is that the radiation levels were so high, and the water they stepped in, some 10,000 times that it should be, that the fear is now there is some kind of leak at the reactor itself. they don't know whether it's an actual breach in the core or the pipes themselves that are leaking but something is leaking. we don't know how much or how long it's been leaking and we don't know why
nuclear plant in japan after water inside tested 10,000 times more radioactive than normal. and this morning officials are expanding the voluntary evacuation zone. we'll have the latest in a live report. >>> wake-up call. the f.a.a. suspends a veteran tower controller after he fell asleep during his overnight shift at reagan national airport. it could lead to major safety changes nationwide. >>> final wish. elizabeth taylor laid to rest during an emotional private service and at her request she arrived fashionably late. one last grand entrance for a hollywood legend today, friday sh mar, hollywood legend today, friday sh mar, march 25, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm mcalistatt lauer. >> i'm ann curry. just a short time ago japan's prime minister delivered an address to his nation issuing an apology to farmers and businesses damaged by the nuclear crisis. he's been thanking the so-called fukushima 50r, the workers who stayed inside the plant trying to cool the reactors. >> the most recent
from japan. officials there now worried about a possible breach at one of those damaged reactors. if a crack or hole isun i ulme mhor r s re evusug authorities grew concerned when two workers suffered burns after they waded into water that turned out to be 10,000 at the plant to a halt today. japan's prime minister calls the situation grave and serious. in the meantime, the death from the quake and tsunami now over 10,000 with more than 17,000 people still missing. >>> meanwhile the crisis in the middle east has prices near $105 a barrel today. and prices will likely be here for a while. economists expect prices to remain high, hovering around the $100 per barrel mark through at least 2013. before the revolution in egypt, oil was trading under $90 a barrel. so how much will these high oil prices drag on our economic recovery? and could it prompt americans to cut back or even rethink our approach to energy entirely? joining me now, an oil trader at the mercantile exchange. he's also author of this new book "oil's endless bid." welcome, dan. what's the right way to think about thes
. >> reporter: the latest in japan japanese safety officials say they suspect the reactor core at the net one of the troubled power plant may have been breached. that raises the possibility of more severe radioactive contamination to the merriment. japan's police agencies as the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami that happened two weeks ago today has top-10 thousand people. more than 17,000 people are still listed as missing. the 6.8 man omar earthquake was felt as far as thailand and china. 20 people are believed to been killed. that death toll could continue to rise it is an underdeveloped country with poor communication. a very small rescue capacity is not going to make things easy there. the country peg the quake at some 0.0 which is higher than the measurement that the u.s. geological survey pin did that. >> darya: african union meeting in ethiopia will be trying to deal with the situation in libya. rebels and the government of khaddafi are expected to be there. french fighter jets hit aircraft and cross road military base deep inside of libya. they have been effectively neutrali
on the big board-- 1.8 billion shares traded on the nasdaq. fresh numbers out of japan tonight on how its massive earthquake will impact auto production. the nikkei newspaper reports the nation's manufacturers will cut annual auto production by 5% or about 400,000 units. with the japanese still trying to get their nuclear crisis under control, the united nations says its time to re- assess nuclear safety. specifically, the u.n. secretary general wants to make sure there's an international emergency response plan in place. >> susie: still ahead, investors are taking a fresh look at silicon valley's young entreprenuers. we look at what's driving the resurgence of venture capital funding. >> tom: polls show investors like the job the federal reserve is doing, but the central bank's approval rating is lower than that of the irs. that assumes you know who ben bernanke is. a separate survey finds seven out of ten americans don't know he's the fed chairman. so now that the federal reserve is going to hold regular press conferences, what will the world's most powerful central bank have to say to
have banned food coming from japan amid fears it's tainted with radiation. taiwan joins singapore, new zealand and the u.s. there's also concern about america's nuclear plants. there are 104 in the u.s. thethose plants. they explain almost 30% of those plants failed to report equipment defects that can pose, quote, substantial safety risks. according to the report, there were 24 such instances in a 10-month period between 2009 and 2010. the inspector general says it prevents regulators to learn about defects that could be cropping up at plants all across the country. so far the lapses haven't led to significant accidents. so far. but this is going to give you chills. it has to do with the bp oil accident in the coast of mexico. what they found is a crucial valve called a blowout preventer didn't work. it was supposed to seal off the pipe when there's pressure. instead they got jammed and left a 1.4 inch space. and all 4.9 million barrels of oil gushed through that space. and that's what caused the worst oil spill in u.s. history. they found it wasn't bp's fault, but a flaw in the desig
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)